Laughing And Smiling In Black Mirror

Science Fiction can be pretty accurately described as “in vogue” right now. Not only is Star Wars once again dominating both the box office and popular culture, but elements of sci-fi are showing up in places as diverse as the Marvel Cinematic Universe, hit TV shows, and, of course, novels uncountable.

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Childish Humor In Greek Mythology

I've loved Greek myths pretty much from the moment I've been able to read them. I'm serious about this; while most kids in elementary school might have been reading any number of young readers books before bed (The Magic Tree House series was another favorite of mine), I was plowing through my copy of D'auleire's Book of Greek Myths over and over until the cover straight up fell off of it.

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Acerbic Humor in Pride And Prejudice

I've only read one Jane Austen novel, the infamous Pride And Prejudice, which I likely never would have read unless it had been forced on me in my senior year AP English Literature class (let that be all the lesson one might need about the often-trash opinions of teenage boys on "girl stuff").

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Silliness In Star Wars

Alright, people, it's time to invite the ire of the internet (although considering my readership never really rises above five or so I should be fine) and write about Star Wars, which has become the internet's most divisive topic after the release of The Last Jedi, the franchise's most recent installment of its current main trilogy.

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The Goofy Ending Of Moby-Dick

One of the most interesting exercises I ever did in college was performed on an unremarkable day in an otherwise unremarkable English class, when our professor challenged us to figure out what the actual first line of Moby-Dick is. I'm not kidding; read the full text of the novel and you'll be struck by the idea that you could choose at least three different points of entry into it, each of which slightly change how we approach the book.

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Slapstick in Romeo And Juliet

Shakespeare is an interesting author, because his works have all been very specifically grouped into genres that are almost unique unto themselves. There are Shakespearean comedies, tragedies, and histories, all of which have their own flavor that separates them more from the works of any other playwright than from each other, and sometimes they overlap in interesting ways: tragedies that contain humor, comedies that have heartbreaking moments, and histories with elements of each.

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